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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Before buying my 2021 trailblazer I had a 2017 Chevy Cruze. The auto stop feature on the Cruze would disengage when the outdoor temp was below +5c I think, plus or minus a few centigrade. My trailblazer seems to auto stop well below zero. Is this normal?
 

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2021 LT AWD
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I have not tested this myself as I habitually disable auto stop when I begin driving, but also had a 17 Cruze before my TB. My cruze also disabled auto stop during low temperatures. While I would be surprised that Chevy removed this feature, you can simply disable the auto stop with the button (which wasn't available in my Cruze). It's possible that the system works differently and has a different temperature threshold for disabling auto stop. This is merely speculation, but my TB has auto temp control (unlike my Cruze) so that may also be factored into the car's "decision" whether or not to disable autostop.
 

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Before buying my 2021 trailblazer I had a 2017 Chevy Cruze. The auto stop feature on the Cruze would disengage when the outdoor temp was below +5c I think, plus or minus a few centigrade. My trailblazer seems to auto stop well below zero. Is this normal?
I did not know that autostop turned on or off based upon outside temperature. I thought it did turn itself on or off based upon your climate controls. If your AC had a demand for cool air it would turn off autostop. If the heat was on it would disengage. Apparently from what you have written it wasn't actually based upon climate controls but outside temp. Interesting.
 

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2021Trailblazer RS AWD Scarlet Red Metallic
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Auto stop/start also turns back on depending on voltage demand. If your lights, heater and other accessories are all on it will restart quicker or not shut off at all. Car batteries do not like cold temps and their output is lower when are cold, so maybe the auto stop/start is disabled at low temps for this reason alone.
 

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2022 Vivid Orange Trailblazer Activ AWD
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From the manual.
There are more reasons it will not engage but here are the not so obvious.

“Auto Stops may not occur and/or auto restarts may occur because:

. The climate control settings require the engine to be running to cool or heat the vehicle interior.
. The vehicle battery needs to charge.
. The vehicle battery has recently been
disconnected.
. The engine or transmission is not at the
required operating temperature.
. The outside temperature is not in the required operating range”


Sent from my iPhone using Tapatalk
 

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Do you think that stopping the engine at intersections is good? And you know that starting the engine is a critical situation and the wear of the engine at startup is much greater than when it is running evenly. When I was studying, we were told about this in the discipline of RELIABILITY. And it really is! To put it another way, then one start of the engine (and indeed any device) is equivalent to a certain time of operation of this device in normal mode. Of course, I can't say how many minutes of engine operation is equivalent to starting it, but our reliability experts calculated that turning on and off a color lamp TV once is equivalent to 2.5 hours of its normal operation. Thus, it makes no sense to turn off such a TV for less than 2.5 hours. This is from the point of view of its technical resource. So the same thing happens with the car. Engine wear is stronger at startup than at idle. And if you stop it at every intersection, then its resource is consumed more than if you didn't stop it. Yes, of course you save fuel, but at the same time you will need to repair the engine on your car earlier than if you did not have an automatic stop function. In this regard, on my car, I turn off this fugktion every time I go. And I have a question for my colleagues. Maybe someone knows how to disable this function so that the car remembers that it never needs to be used??
 

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Do you think that stopping the engine at intersections is good? And you know that starting the engine is a critical situation and the wear of the engine at startup is much greater than when it is running evenly. When I was studying, we were told about this in the discipline of RELIABILITY. And it really is! To put it another way, then one start of the engine (and indeed any device) is equivalent to a certain time of operation of this device in normal mode. Of course, I can't say how many minutes of engine operation is equivalent to starting it, but our reliability experts calculated that turning on and off a color lamp TV once is equivalent to 2.5 hours of its normal operation. Thus, it makes no sense to turn off such a TV for less than 2.5 hours. This is from the point of view of its technical resource. So the same thing happens with the car. Engine wear is stronger at startup than at idle. And if you stop it at every intersection, then its resource is consumed more than if you didn't stop it. Yes, of course you save fuel, but at the same time you will need to repair the engine on your car earlier than if you did not have an automatic stop function. In this regard, on my car, I turn off this fugktion every time I go. And I have a question for my colleagues. Maybe someone knows how to disable this function so that the car remembers that it never needs to be used??
I read an interesting article on this subject:
-First point was that yes frequent starting caused by auto stop will cause additional wear. BUT manufacturers have taken this under consideration in engine design. It said "
In the short term, though, you don’t have to worry too much about whether your engine or its various components are being damaged by frequent starts. They’ve been engineered for it, and they’re different than the components in a vehicle without this technology.
Second: "
Cold engine startup is commonly recognized as the most vulnerable time for internal engine components. The lubricant is cold, and it hasn’t had time to pressurize and lubricate all of the moving components on the top of the engine.
Auto stop-start systems aren’t as potentially damaging as cold starts, though, simply because the engine isn’t cold. Not only are the engines at operating temperature before the stop-start system begins to work, the vehicles also use electric water pumps to maintain optimal engine temperature when they’re stopped. If the engine is off long enough to reduce engine temperature significantly, the engine will automatically restart.
Secondly, while the engine’s oiling system isn’t completely pressurized as it is when it’s running, the oil in the passages hasn’t been allowed to completely run down into the oil pan.
Finally, suppliers are addressing wear with dry lubricants on components like main engine bearings. Engine bearings are typically designed to withstand 100,000 start cycles. New bearings are now in use that are designed to withstand 250,000 to 300,000 start cycles. Federal Mogul, for example, has been incorporating polymers on the connecting rod bearings for cars with auto-stop/start systems to reduce friction when oil isn’t pumping."
Personally I don't like this feature. I find it a pain in the butt and not necessary as even the manufacturers say at its optimum it saves 3% on fuel consumption.
Lastly I found this interesting:Owners of sporty cars with “Dynamic” or “Sport” modes will note that selecting those modes will automatically disable the system, too. I will try this out tomorrow and see if it is true for TB.
This too was of interest: For example, Mazda has a technology called i-Stop that doesn’t use a starter for restarts at all. It uses engine combustion. As a driver releases the brake pedal, the fuel injector in one cylinder fires and the spark plug ignites, allowing the engine to start with combustion, rather than an electric starter motor.
 
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